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February 09, 2009

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Jim Weaver

"Since Flex is open source, do you know why Sun didn't decide to support Flex altogether? In other words, allow developers to write in Flex, and render graphics on the JVM instead of the Flash player."

Bruce,
Actually, Dean Iverson wrote the article. To answer your question: I can't speak for Sun, but the main reasons that I'm passionate about JavaFX is that
1) It *is* rich-client Java (e.g. it compiles to JVM bytecode and can use Java classes directly.)
2) The simple, declarative, scripting makes it easy to express the user interface, including UI layout classes for cross-platform development (e.g. avoids absolute positioning).

Thanks Bruce!
Jim Weaver

Bruce Hopkins

Jim,

I agree with you completely in this post. I think Google might be too "full of themselves". Now, it sounds like you've used Flex before, so let me ask you a theoretical question. I would expect that you can objectively compare the maturity of both JavaFX and Flex. I also find it very encouraging that JavaFX supports Flash 9 video to some degree. Since Flex is opensource, do you know why Sun didn't decide to support Flex altogether? In other words, allow developers to write in Flex, and render graphics on the JVM instead of the Flash player.

From a maturity standpoint, Flex has already worked out the kinks that JavaFX and Silverlight will have to figure out. Additionally, Flex has great tooling support that attracts both developers and designers. So, I'm curious of your thoughts.

Bruce

Maya Incaand

"And yes, Sun could have just watched passively as Microsoft and Adobe fought it out, but I, for one, am glad they did not. I have a lot of time and effort invested in the Java platform and in the Java code I've written over the years. I am very glad not to have to abandon all of that in order to be able to develop rich client applications for desktop, mobile, and the web."

Me too having just spent 3 years getting to grips with Java(and having to suffer jibes from compatriots:-))

If you know some Java, then JavaFX is not that difficult to pick up.

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